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Hebraism in Religion, History, and Politics: The Third Culture
Steven Grosby
Hebraism in Religion, History, and Politics is an investigation into Hebraism… Read more
The Great Revolt: Inside the Populist Coalition Reshaping American Politics
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A CNN political analyst and a Republican strategist reframe the… Read more
The Case for Nationalism: How It Made Us Powerful, United, and Free
Rich Lowry
It is one of our most honored clichés that America… Read more
Speechless: Controlling Words, Controlling Minds
Michael Knowles
“Political correctness” has taken politeness and turned it into a… Read more
The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left
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An acclaimed portrait of Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the… Read more

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The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam (2017)

Douglas Murray

A controversial and devastatingly honest depiction of the demise of Europe.

The Strange Death of Europe is the internationally bestselling account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Douglas Murray takes a step back and explores the deeper issues behind the continent’s possible demise, from an atmosphere of mass terror attacks and a global refugee crisis to the steady erosion of our freedoms. He addresses the disappointing failure of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel’s U-turn on migration, and the Western fixation on guilt. Murray travels to Berlin, Paris, Scandinavia, and Greece to uncover the malaise at the very heart of the European culture, and to hear the stories of those who have arrived in Europe from far away.

Declining birth rates, mass immigration, and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive alteration as a society and an eventual end. This sharp and incisive book ends up with two visions for a new Europe–one hopeful, one pessimistic–which paint a picture of Europe in crisis and offer a choice as to what, if anything, we can do next. But perhaps Spengler was right: “civilizations like humans are born, briefly flourish, decay, and die.”

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